Fading away

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Fading away

Postby zemlin » Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:13 pm

I'll be on here less and less over time.
I've taken the Makergear printer out of service as I've moved to Raise3D printers - an N2 (12x12x12) and an N2+ (12x12x24). I needed machines that were capable of faster print speeds and that had a more stable build platform for some of the larger & heavier parts I've been running.

Still like the M2 for sure, but I don't have the space for 3 machines.

The community here was a HUGE factor in my success in 3D printing, and a lot of what I learned here was used in deciding on early modifications for the Raise machines. They're pretty, but have their own limitations that I needed to address.

I want to say a BIG Thank You to the folks here on the board, and the Makergear crew too, as you've been great to work with.
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Re: Fading away

Postby Farr0wn3d » Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:18 am

I know this question will probably garner criticism from other forum members, but I am curious to hear your thoughts on the raise printers. They seemed too good to be true, so I never pulled the trigger on one.
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Re: Fading away

Postby zemlin » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:30 pm

Farr0wn3d wrote:I know this question will probably garner criticism from other forum members, but I am curious to hear your thoughts on the raise printers. They seemed too good to be true, so I never pulled the trigger on one.

Out of the box they have some significant weaknesses. I spent some time lurking on the forums and had a good feel for the machine's weaknesses before I gave them money. I had third-party parts to swap into the machine in-hand when the machine showed up (by truck!).

In my opinion it's a great foundation. I wouldn't recommend a Raise printer as a first printer. If you have your head wrapped around 3D printing already and are willing to do some work to make the machine what you want it to be, you'll end up with a good rig. The two things I like most about it are the dual ball screws on the Z-stage, and that X&Y are both on the gantry, so tall build aren't shaken during the build. I'm getting faster, better quality builds with the RAISE machine than I was able to get with the M2 - but that's after machine mods.

They claim their bed is fixed and doesn't need to be adjusted. Well, that's a stretch - and adjusting the bed requires messing with 39 adjusting screws. That was one of the first things to go. I have a 4-point setup on mine now. I made additional changes to the bed setup and have one more change on the drawing board - I just need to figure out how to get the material for it.

Their extruder drive has a number of issues. Luckily Bondtech has a drop-in replacement which is an awesome drive and it removes almost full pound from the gantry weight. It also results in a significant improvement in build quality. Also the gantry is supported on long, 8mm shafts. There's a little bit of droop in the middle. The Bondtech drive helps due to the weight reduction, but if you wanted to do a big build with very thin layers, you'd probably need to run a raft. With the layer thicknesses I run (.25mm is pretty typical) it hasn't been an issue.

The Z-axis is very high resolution, so I have run small prints with .025mm layers and a .2mm nozzle and they turned out surprisingly good.

The XY steppers are exceptionally quiet, which makes a great first impression. Unfortunately the stepper drivers they use to make it quiet aren't the most robust in terms of stepper control - so start pushing speeds and accelerations and you'll start skipping - especially if you are running the hefty factory extruder drive. The stepper drivers are standard drop-in modules so I replaced mine. It was a quick, easy swap and cost me $20. My X&Y axes sing now, but the motion control is far more reliable. Installing dampers on the motors help with the noise.

The machine is fully enclosed, but there's no temperature control in the enclosure. Internal temperatures can run pretty high on a big ABS print, or if you're running PLA you need to have the doors open. Temperature control is next on my todo list.

There is no separate fan for print/nozzle cooling and no fan speed control. The connector is there on the gantry and some folks have added a third fan. I so rarely print material that requires cooling it hasn't been an issue for me yet - but I'm keeping my eyes open in case someone comes up with a great solution.
Last edited by zemlin on Fri Feb 23, 2018 3:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Fading away

Postby Farr0wn3d » Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:26 pm

very thorough, Zemlin. Thank you for that review :)
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